Sock hop, car show turns 30

0
66
People and classic cars fill Center Street in Prospect last year during the annual Sock Hop and Car Show. This year’s show is Sunday. –FILE PHOTO
People and classic cars fill Center Street in Prospect last year during the annual Sock Hop and Car Show. This year’s show is Sunday. –FILE PHOTO

PROSPECT — Classic cars will roll into town this weekend.

Prospect’s 30th annual Sock Hop and Car Show is Sunday from 1 to 6 p.m. on the Prospect Green on Center Street.

“You can take a walk down memory lane,” Mayor Robert Chatfield said. “You’ll see a lot of history.”

Chatfield said the event typically draws around 800 classic vehicles each year. This year’s attractions include a street bus that ran in Waterbury during the 1960s, a street sweeper from the 1950s, and a variety of classic police and emergency vehicles, Chatfield said.

“It is a nice family walk around event,” Chatfield said.

The event will also feature Steve Magnante, a commentator for Barrett-Jackson Auctions on Fox Sports TV. Magnante is known for having an encyclopedic knowledge of cars.

Trophies will be presented for the vehicles in multiple categories, including military vehicles and emergency vehicles, at 5:15 p.m., Chatfield said.

Visitors will also be treated to music from 1950s and 1960s with performances by The Rockin’ Heartbeats and the Sharades. The event will also feature a variety of food from local restaurants.
The event, which is entering its third decade year, started off as a small event.

“Thirty years ago I wanted to do a sock hop. I put it on by myself and had 42 cars show up. The second year had 100 cars show up,” Chatfield said.

After the second year the Prospect Car Owners Association formed and has been working with the mayor’s office on the car show ever since, Chatfield said.

Entrance to the event is free and visitors can park at the Town Hall, Long River Middle School, or St. Anthony’s Church, all of which are adjacent to the Green.

“You can go there for three hours and not spend any money, except for the food,” Chatfield said. “It’s a real hometown atmosphere.”