Company set to submit energy park application

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An artist's rendering of the proposed Beacon Falls Energy Park. CT Energy & Technology wants to build the fuel cell power plant on a 23.8-acre piece of land owned by O&G Industries off of Lopus Road. –CONTRIBUTED
An artist’s rendering of the proposed Beacon Falls Energy Park. CT Energy & Technology wants to build the fuel cell power plant on a 23.8-acre piece of land owned by O&G Industries off of Lopus Road. –CONTRIBUTED

BEACON FALLS — CT Energy & Technology is preparing to submit its application to the Connecticut Siting Council for the proposed Beacon Falls Energy Park.

CT Energy & Technology, a Connecticut-based development company, has proposed building a 66.3-megawatt fuel cell energy park on a 23.8-acre site off Lopus Road. The park will be built on a former quarry owned by O&G Industries.

William Corvo of William Corvo Consultants, Inc. in Middletown and one of the founders of CT Energy & Technology, said the company plans to file a petition for a declaratory ruling with the Connecticut Siting Council by the end of the month.

Once the petition is submitted to the council, the council will have 180 days to make its decision.

Connecticut Citing Council Acting Executive Director Melanie Bachman said the energy park is required to come before the council because it is a fuel cell project.

Once the council receives the petition, it will assign an analyst to review the proposal, Bachman said. The analyst will set up a field review with two members of the council and the proponents of the energy park.

Once the field review was completed, the analyst will draft a report and the energy park would be placed on the council’s agenda, she said.

At that point the council can choose to approve it, deny it or hold a public hearing, Bachman said. The public can petition for a public hearing. The council will take the public’s request into consideration when making its decision on whether to have a hearing, but does not need to grant one, Bachman said.

If the council decides to approve the project as it is, the energy park can move forward, Bachman said. However, it is more likely the council will request a development and management plan, which is a final site plan.

If a final site plan is required, the council will have 60 days to make its final decision after its submitted.