Vet sets up shop in Beacon Falls

From left, Donna Rollinson, veterinarian Cheryl Sackler and Gibson Fernandez, a professor of veterinary medicine from Venezuela, talk at the Beacon Falls Veterinary Hospital July 28. The hospital is scheduled to open Aug. 5. –LUKE MARSHALL

From left, Donna Rollinson, veterinarian Cheryl Sackler and Gibson Fernandez, a professor of veterinary medicine from Venezuela, talk at the Beacon Falls Veterinary Hospital July 28. The hospital is scheduled to open Aug. 5. –LUKE MARSHALL

BEACON FALLS — A former medical office on Pinesbridge Road will once again be accepting patients — only now the patients will be pets instead of people.

Veterinarian Cheryl Sackler will open the Beacon Falls Veterinary Hospital Aug. 5 at 45 Pinesbridge Road.

Sackler, a Woodbridge resident, owned the Naugatuck Veterinary Hospital for 25 years before she sold it. After selling the practice, Sackler continued to work there for another six years until recently when she decided to start another veterinary hospital.

Sackler said she chose the Beacon Falls location because it is convenient to Route 8 and she is familiar with the town.

“I know a lot of people here in town. I was their vet back in the 1980s,” Sackler said. “I always thought Beacon Falls would be a really cool place. I like a small town. I enjoy the intimacy of a small town.”

In addition to veterinary services, the hospital will also offer grooming services. Oxford native Donna Rollinson has partnered with Sackler for the grooming side of the business.

Beacon Falls Economic Development Commission Chairman Jeremy Rodorigo said the building the veterinary hospital moved into was the medical office for doctors Sudipta and Bindu Dey before they moved up the street to 127 Pinesbridge Road.

“It really worked out perfect for a veterinary hospital. It was a medical practice and is set up in a way to do business like that,” Rodorigo said.

Rodorigo’s pleased that Sackler chose Beacon Falls to open her practice.

“It’s a great addition to Beacon Falls because we don’t have those services here and there are lots of people who have pets,” Rodorigo said.

Sackler said once her practice becomes established she would like to expand. She is hoping to hire Gibson Fernandez, a professor of veterinary medicine in Venezuela and a close friend, as a second veterinarian.

In fact all of the staff working at the hospital has been friends for a number of years.

“Nobody is coming to work for me that I haven’t known for at least 20 years,” Sackler said.

The Beacon Falls Veterinary Hospital is not the only new business to come into town recently.

Nordco, a manufacturing company that makes railroad-driving equipment, recently found a new home in Beacon Falls.

The company, which opened a new branch at 125 Railroad Ave. in the Murtha Industrial Park in June, has been in operation since the 1940s.

Rodorigo said Nordco moving in shows the town is open for business.

“It is definitely going to be a boost to the town’s image. It’s going to be a boost to our tax roles. It goes to show that Beacon Falls is truly a business-friendly environment,” Rodorigo said.

Rodorigo said Nordco has done a lot of work on the building since moving into its new facility.

“I went in and visited when they were moving in. Their offices look beautiful. They spent a lot of time and money in upgrading them,” Rodorigo said. “They are a top-notch outfit and I welcome them to town.”

A representative of Nordco could not be reached for comment as of this post.

It isn’t just new businesses that are bringing new innovations to town.

Kolga, LLC, a designer and manufacturer of high performance radiation shielding products located at 141 South Main St., is looking to expand and to produce its own energy.

According to Rodorigo, the company wants to install wind turbines on its light poles, which would produce enough energy to power the company.

Rodorigo said Lee Nemeth, who owns Kolga, brought this idea to the Economic Development Commission recently.

Rodorigo said the proposed wind turbines would not be seen or heard by any of the neighbors.

“They would be relatively small. It won’t affect anyone but his business. This is a guy who cares about his neighbors,” Rodorigo said.

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